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Coats of Arms - Kings of Arms
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GARTER KINGS OF ARMS
The principal English king of arms. The office was instituted by King Henry V in 1415, William Bruges being the first to hold it. Garter has no province but is chairman of the Chapter of the English officers of arms. He grants supporters, arms to peers, signs all grants of arms together with the appropriate provincial kings and has special duties in connection with the Order of the Garter

1415 - 1450 William Bruges
1450 - 1478 John Smert
1478 - 1504 John Wrythe
1505 - 1534 Sir Thomas Wrythe (alias Wriothesley, and son of John)
1534 - 1536 Thomas Wall
1536 - 1550 Sir Christopher Barker
1550 - 1584 Sir Gilbert Dethick
1584 - 1586 (Robert Cooke, Clarenceux appointed Acting Garter.)
1586 - 1606 Sir William Dethick (son of Gilbert)
1607 - 1633 Sir William Segar
1633 - 1643 Sir John Borough
1643 - 1644 Sir Henry St George (son of Sir Richard, Clarenceux)
1645 - 1677 Sir Edward Walker
1643 - 1660 Sir Edward Bysshe, intruded c.1643, comfirmed by Parliament 20 Oct 1646
1677 - 1686 Sir William Dugdale
1686 - 1703 Sir Thomas St George (eldest son of Sir Henry)
1703 - 1715 Sir Henry St George (second surviving son of Sir Henry)
1715 - 1718 vacancy (disputed gartership)
1718 - 1744 John Anstis
1744 - 1754 John Anstis (son of above and joint Garter with his father in 1727 - 1744)
1754 - 1773 Stephen Martin Leake
1773 - 1774 Sir Charles Townley
1774 - 1780 Thomas Browne
1780 - 1784 Ralph Bigland
1784 - 1822 Sir Isaac Heard
1822 - 1831 Sir George Nayler
1831 - 1838 Sir Ralph Bigland (son of Ralph)
1838 - 1842 Sir William Woods
1842 - 1869 Sir Charles George Young
1869 - 1904 Sir Albert William Woods
1904 - 1918 Sir Alfred Scott Scott-Gatty
1918 - 1930 Sir Henry Farnham Burke
1930 - 1944 Sir Gerald Woods Wollaston (subsequently Norroy and Ulster)
1944 - 1950 Sir Algar Henry Stafford Howard
1950 - 1961 The Hon. Sir George Rothe Bellew
1961 - 1978 Sir Anthony Richard Wagner (subsequently Clarenceux)
1978 - 1992 Sir Alexander Colin Cole
1992 - 1995 Sir Conrad Marshall John Fisher Swan
1995 - ???? Peter Llewellyn Gwynn-Jones, C.V.O., M.A., (Cambridge), F.S.A.

 

CLARENCEUX KING OF ARMS
The senior of the two English provincial kings of arms. His jurisdiction lies south of the River Trent. Clarenceux has had the southern province since 1420. His official arms are: argent, a cross gules, on a chief of the last a lion passant guardant crowned Or.

c.1334 Andrew
c.1383 Richard Spenser
c.1419 William Horsley
c.1425 - 1435 John Cosoun
1435 - 1460 Roger Legh
1461 - 1476 William Hawkeslowe
1476 - 1485 Sir Thomas Holme
1485 - 1487 vacancy (possibly filled by John More as Normandy King of Arms).
1487 - 1493 Sir Thomas Holme
1493 - 1510 Roger Machado
1510 - 1511 Christopher Carlill
1511 - 1534 Thomas Benolt
1534 - 1536 Thomas Tonge
1536 - 1557 Thomas Hawley
1557 - 1567 William Hervy
1567 - 1593 Robert Cooke
1594 - 1597 Richard Lee or Leigh
1597 - 1623 William Camden
1623 - 1635 Sir Richard St George
1635 - 1646 Sir William Le Neve
1646 - 1650 Arthur Squibb, appointed by vote of Parliament 20 Oct. 1646
1650 - 1655 Edward Bysshe, appointed by vote of Parliament 12 June 1650 (as well as Garter)
1658 - 1661 William Ryley, intruded c.Sept. 1658
1661 - 1679 Sir Edward Bysshe (previously intruded Garter)
1680 - 1703 Sir Henry St George (subsequently Garter)
1704 - 1726 Sir John Vanbrugh
1726 - 1741 Knox Ward
1741 - 1754 Stephen Martin Leake (subsequently Garter)
1755 - 1773 Charles Townley (subsequently Garter)
1773 - 1774 Thomas Browne (subsequently Garter)
1774 - 1780 Ralph Bigland (subsequently Garter)
1780 - 1784 Isaac Heard (subsequently Garter)
1784 - 1803 Thomas Lock
1803 - 1820 George Harrison
1820 - 1822 Sir George Nayler (subsequently Garter)
1822 - 1831 Ralph Bigland (subsequently Garter)
1831 - 1838 William Woods (subsequently Garter)
1838 - 1839 Edmund Lodge
1839 - 1846 Joseph Hawker
1846 - 1848 Francis Martin
1848 - 1859 James Pulman
1859 - 1882 Robert Laurie
1882 - 1894 Walter Aston Blount
1894 - 1911 George Edward Cokayne
1911 - 1919 Sir William Henry Weldon
1919 - 1920 Charles Harold Athill
1922 - 1926 William Alexander Lindsay
1926 - 1927 Gordon Ambrose de Lisle Lee
1927 - 1954 Sir Arthur William Steuart Cochrane
1954 - 1955 Archibald George Blomefield Russel
1955 - 1967 Sir John Dunamace Heaton-Armstrong
1968 - 1978 John Riddell Bromhead Walker
1978 - 1995 Sir Anthony Richard Wagner (formerly Garter)
1995 - 1997 Sir John Philip Brooke Brook-Little
1997 - ???? David Hubert Boothby Chesshyre

 

NORROY KINGS OF ARMS
The junior of the two provincial English kings of arms. His jurisdiction used to lie north of the River Trent. The name Norroy has been consistently used for the northern king since 1464. In 1943 the office was joined to that of the Ulster King of Arms so that Norroy and Ulster now has jurisdiction in the six counties as well as in the north of England. The arms of the office of Norroy are: argent a cross gules, on a chief per pale azure and gules, a lion passant guardant, crowned with an open crown, between a fleur-de-lis and a key, all Or. There are no arms for the combined office of Norroy and Ulster.

c.1276 Peter(?de Horbury)
c.1323 William de Morlee
c.1338 Andrew ______
c.1386 John Lake or Othelake, alias March temp. Ric II ?Roger Durroit
c.1399 Richard Bruges or del Brugge
c.1426 John Ashwell
1436 William Boys
c.1450 William Tyndale or Tendale
c.1462 William Grimsby
1464 - 1476 Thomas Holme (subsequently Clarenceux)
1477 - 1478 John Wrythe (subsequently Garter)
1478 - 1485 John More
1485 - 1493 Roger Machado (subsequently Clarenceux)
1494 - 1510 Christopher Carlill
1510 - 1511 Thomas Benolt (subsequently Clarenceux)
1511 - 1516 John Yonge or Young
1516 - 1522 Thomas Wall
1522 John Joyner
1522 - 1534 Thomas Tonge (subsequently Clarenceux)
1534 - 1536 Thomas Hawley or Halley (subsequently Clarenceux)
1536 Christopher Barker (subsequently Garter)
1536 - 1547 William Fellow
1547 - 1550 Gilbert Dethick (subsequently Garter)
1550 - 1557 William Hervy (subsequently Clarenceux)
1557 - 1561 Laurence Dalton
1562 - 1588 William Flower
1588 - 1592 vacancy
1592 - 1593 Edmund Knight
1593 - 1597 vacancy
1597 - 1604 William Segar (subsequently Garter)
1604 - 1623 Richard St George (subsequently Clarenceux)
1623 - 1633 John Borough (Subsequently Garter)
1633 - 1635 William Le Neve (subseqently Clarenceux)
1635 - 1643 Sir Henry St George (subsequently Garter)
1643 - 1645 Edward Walker (subsequently Garter)
1646 - 1658 William Ryley (intruded 20 Aug. and confirmed by Parliament 20 Oct. 1646)
1658 - 1660 George Owen (intruded c. Sept. 1658)
1660 - 1677 William Dugdale (subsequently Garter)
1677 - 1680 Sir Henry St George (subsequently Clarenceux and Garter)
1680 - 1686 Sir Thomas St George (subsequently Garter)
1686 - 1700 Sir John Dugdale
1700 - 1704 Robert Devenish
1704 - 1729 Peter Le Neve
1729 - 1741 Stephen Martin Leake (subsequently Clarenceux and Garter)
1741 - 1751 John Cheale
1751 - 1755 Charles Townley (subsequently Clarenceux and Garter)
1755 - 1761 William Oldys
1761 - 1773 Thomas Browne (subsequently Clarenceux and Garter)
1773 - 1774 Ralph Bigland (subsequently Clarenceaux and Garter)
1774 - 1780 Isaac Heard (subsequently Clarenceux and Garter)
1780 - 1784 Peter Dore
1781 - 1784 Thomas Lock (subsequently Clarenceux)
1784 - 1803 George Harrison (subsequently Clarenceux)
1803 - 1822 Ralph Bidland (subsequently Clarenceux and Garter)
1822 - 1838 Edmund Lodge (subsequently Clarenceux)
1838 - 1839 Joseph Hawker (subsequently Clarenceux)
1839 - 1846 Francis Martin (subsequently Clarenceux)
1846 - 1848 James Pulman (subsequently Clarenceux)
1848 - 1849 Edward Howard Gibbon, afterwards Howard-Gibbon
1849 - 1859 Robert Laurie (subsequently Clarenceux)
1859 - 1882 Walter Aston Blount (subsequently Clarenceux)
1882 - 1894 George Edward Cokayne (subsequently Clarenceux)
1894 - 1911 William Henry Weldon (subsequently Clarenceux)
1911 - 1919 Henry Farnham Burke (subsequently Garter)
1919 Charles Harold Athill (subsequently Clarenceux)
1919 - 1922 William Alexander Lindsay (subsequently Clarenceux)
1922 - 1926 Gordon Ambrose De Lisle Lee (subsequently Clarenceux)
1926 - 1928 Arthur William Steuart cochrane (subsequently Clarenceux)
1928 - 1930 Gerald Woods Wollaston (subsequently Garter and later Norroy and Ulster)
1930 - 1943 Algar Henry Stafford Howard (subsequently Garter)

 

NORROY AND ULSTER KINGS OF ARMS
The title of the former principal herald of all Ireland. The office was instituted by King Edward VI in 1552-3. His office was at Dublin Castle and when the Order of St. Patrick was institued in 1783 he became the registrar and Knight Attendant. His official arms were: "Or, a cross gules, on a chief of the last, a lion passant guardant between a harp and a portcullis, all Or." In 1943 the office was merged with that of Norroy King of Arms.

1943 - 1944 Algar Henry Stafford Howard
1944 - 1957 Sir Gerald Woods Wollaston (formerly Garter)
1957 - 1966 Aubrey John Toppin
1966 - 1971 Richard Preston Graham-Vivian
1971 - 1980 Walter John George Verco
1980 - ???? John Philip Brooke Brooke-Little

 

LORD LYON KINGS OF ARMS
1399 - ???? Henry Greve
1410 - 1421 _____ Douglas
1471 - ???? unknown
1489 - ???? Sir Andrew Murray of Truim
1496 - 1512 Henry Thomson of Keillour
1512 - 1519 Sir William cumming of Inverallochy
1522 - ???? Thomas Pettigrew of Magdalensyde
1542 - 1555 Sir David Lindsay of the Mount
1555 - 1567 Sir Robert Forman of Luthrie
1567 - 1568 Sir William Stewart of Luthrie
1568 - 1591 Sir David Lindsay of Rathillet
1591 - 1620 Sir David Lindsay of the Mount
1620 - 1630 Sir Jerome Lindsay of Annatland
1630 - 1654 Sir James Balfour of Denmilne, Bt
1658 - 1660 Sir James Campbell of Lawers
1660 - 1663 Sir Alexander Durham of Largo
1663 - 1677 Sir Charles Erskine of Cambo, 1st Bt. (father of next)
1672 - 1727 Sir Alexander Erskine of Cambo, 2nd Bt. (joint Lyon with his father, father of the next)
1701 - ???? Sir Alexander Erskine, younger of Cabo (joint Lyon with his father, whom he predeceased)
1727 - 1754 Alexander Brodie of that Ilk.
1754 - 1795 John Hooke Campbell of Bangeston, co. Pembroke
1795 - 1796 Robert Boswell (interim Lyon)
1796 - 1804 Robert Auriol (Hay-Drummond), 10th Earl of Kinnoull
1804 - 1866 Thomas Robert (Hay-Drummond) 11th Earl of Kinnoull
1866 - 1890 George Burnett
1890 - 1926 Sir James Balfour Paul
1927 - 1929 Captain George Sitwell Campbell Swinton
1929 - 1945 Sir Francis James grant
1945 - 1969 Sir Thomas Innes of Learney
1969 - 1981 Sir James Monteith Grant
1981 - 2001 Malcolm Rognvald Innes of Edingight (son of Sir Thomas Innes)
2001 - ???? Robin Blair

 

CHESTER HERALD
Chester is said to have been instituted by Edward III as herald of the Prince of Wales. The title was in abeyance for a time under Henry VIII, but since 1525 Chester has been one of the heralds in ordinary. In 1911, when the future Edward VIII was created Prince of Wales, Chester was one of his retinue.
Badge: A Garb Or [from the arms of the Earl of Chester] royally crowned.

 

LANCASTER HERALD
Originally Lancaster, whether as herald of arms or as a king of arms, was retained by the earls and dukes of Lancaster. The title first appears in 1347 when Lancaster herald made a proclamation at the siege of Calais. On Henry IV's accession he was put on the Crown establishment and made king of the northern province. That arrangement was continued under Henry V and VI, but ceased by 1464. Thereafter Lancaster reverted to the rank of herald. Since the time of Henry VII Lancaster has been one of the six heralds in ordinary.
Badge: The red rose of Lancaster royally crowned.

 

RICHMOND HERALD
Richmond occurs from 1421 to 1485 as herald of John, Duke of Bedford, George, Duke of Clarence, and Henry, Earl of Richmond, all of whom held the Honour of Richmond. Henry on his accession to the throne as Henry VII in 1485 made Roger Machado, the then Richmond, a king of arms, since whose death in 1510 Richmond has been one of the six heralds in ordinary.
Badge: The red rose of Lancaster and the white rose en soleil of York dimidiated per pale and royally crowned.

 

SOMERSET HERALD
This title has been successively private, royal, at once private and extraordinary, and again royal. In 1448-9 Somerset was herald of Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, but he must have been a royal officer in 1485, when he was the only herald to receive coronation liveries.
In 1525, when Henry Fitzroy was made Duke of Richmond and Somerset, the then Somerset herald was transferred to the duke's household and as such he must be counted a private officer, although he was appointed by the King and shared the heralds' fees as a herald extraordinary. On Fitzroy's death in 1536 the then incumbent returned to the Crown establishment, and since then Somerset has been one of the heralds in ordinary.
Badge: A portcullis or royally crowned, the Tudor version of the Beaufort badge.

 

WINDSOR HERALD
The office of Windsor is said to have been instituted by Edward III. Windsor has been one of the six heralds in ordinary since 1419 at least.
Badge: Edward III's (Edward of Windsor) sun-burst, that is golden sun rays shooting upwards from a bank of white cloud, royally crowned.

 

YORK HERALD
It has been suggested that York herald was originally the officer of Edmund of Langley, created Duke of York in 1385, but the first reliable reference to York is in a patent of 1484 granting to John Water alias Yorke, herald, as fee of his office and for services to Richard III, his predecessors and ancestors, the manor of Bayhall in Pembury, Kent, and £8 6s. 8d. a year from the lordship of Huntingfield, Kent. He is now one of the six heralds in ordinary.
Badge: The Yorkist white rose en soleil royally crowned.

 

BLUEMANTLE PURSUIVANT
This officer, now one of the four pursuivants in ordinary, is said to have been instituted by Henry V for the service of the Order of the Garter, from whose blue mantle the title is almost certainly derived.
Badge: A bluemantle lined ermine and with gold cords and tassels.

 

PORTCULLIS PURSUIVANT
One of the four pursuivants in ordinary, instituted by Henry VII, probably soon after his accession, in allusion to the well known badge inherited from his mother, Lady Margaret Beaufort.
Badge: A portcullis chained or.

 

ROUGE CROIX PURSUIVANT
Rouge Croix or Red Cross took his name from the red cross of St. George, badge of the Order of the Garter and sometime national flag of England. He is said to be the oldest of the four pursuivants in ordinary, but the earliest known mention of the title is in the sixth year of the reign of Henry V, 1418/19, when Rouge Croix was at Caudebec.
Badge: A red cross, either couped or in a white roundel.

 

ROUGE DRAGON PURSUIVANT
Instituted by Henry VII on 29 October 1485, the eve of his coronation, in reference to the royal badge, the 'red dragon of Cadwallader'. One of the four pursuivants in ordinary. Badge: A rouge dragon passant on a green mount.


Heralds receive yearly salaries from the Crown - Garter King of Arms £49.07, the two provincial Kings of Arms £20.25, the six heralds £17.80, and the four pursuivants £13.95. These salaries were fixed at higher levels by James I but reduced by William IV in the 1830s. The work of the heralds is otherwise unassisted from public funds. However, in addition to their official duties, they have for many centuries undertaken private practice in heraldry and genealogy, for which they are allowed to charge professional fees.
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